Blessings

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On Good Friday, our yorkie of 12 years, Zelda, passed away from congestive heart failure. Zelda was more of a fur baby than a dog in our house. We loved her more than we do most people if I’m being honest. I’m almost certain my mom loved her as much as (if not more than) me. I don’t remember much about life before she came into our lives, so the loss of that precious baby was heartbreaking. I just kept praying to God for strength and comfort.
We knew it would be incredibly lonely in our house without little pattering feet running around, so adopting another dog was inevitable. We just didn’t realize how soon that would be.
While looking at puppies online, we found a possible choice not too far away. A phone call later (which was only intended to see if there were any puppies left and when we could see about adopting one), and we were on our way to pick up a little female chiweenie (chihuahua and dachshund).
Sweet story so far, right? A death and resurrection (if you can use symbolism for adopting a puppy) all during Easter weekend. Let me get to the even better part now.
When my mom talked to the owner on the phone, he told her that God had told him to hold on to the last puppy because someone really needed her. As soon as my mom said our yorkie of 12 years had passed away, the man said he knew she was a good person and needed a new puppy to lift her spirit.
And if that wasn’t beautiful enough…
The puppy was born on January 20th— my mom’s birthday.
God works in mysterious ways, friends.

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Meet our little girl, Fifer!

I’m Thankful, But…

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During high school, I had the opportunity to earn 38 college credit hours through a dual-enrollment program with a local college. This allowed me to enter my first year at university as a sophomore. This is great because I can (Lord willin’) graduate a year early with a degree. And I’m thankful for all of this. I’m thankful that I was able to get a year behind me while in high school. I’m thankful for how those dual-enrollment classes prepared me. I’m really thankful I have music appreciation behind me (ha!). But this has its disadvantage.

My last two years of high school I knew I would major in chemistry and go into pharmacy. In fact, I was dead set on this and really irritated when people told me I might change my mind. Fast-forward to this past fall during my first semester at university. I called my mom crying almost every night. Literally. I was very bored and completely stressed at the same time in every science class. I loathed the pre-requisites and knew I would be miserable if I took any more. I needed creativity. I decided to change my major within the first half of the semester. I had changed my mind like I was told I might. I was done.

The problem here lies in the fact that I had no clue what I was going to like once I entered college (for real). For me, the structure of science courses didn’t work, and I also wasn’t interested in anything I was learning. My English and debate classes, however, were my favorites. I realized I’m really interested in social issues and creative outlets— not whatever the Krebs Cycle is (I somehow made an A in biology, though).

Dual-enrollment made me feel like I had to know what I was going to major in as soon as I came to college. It meant that I had one less year to figure out what I was into, then I had to start classes in my major. I knew that after this year I needed to have a plan. It would all be fine if everyone knew exactly what they wanted to be when they grow up (and stuck with it,) but a lot of people end up changing their minds.

I’m really thankful to have a year of college behind me, but it also pressured me into making some big decisions about my future earlier than I was ready for. I still suggest taking dual-enrollment classes as a high school student, but I think more students need to know it may cause them to feel hurried through college.